Multipark

Faculty of Medicine | Lund University

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MultiPark

MOVING SCIENCE FORWARD

MultiPark is a strategic research area funded by the Swedish Government. Building on the strong tradition of cutting-edge research on Parkinson's and Alzheimer's diseases at Lund University, our vision is to create new and innovative strategies for improved and novel treatments, disease modifications and eventually cures for neurodegenerative diseases, in order to improve the quality of life for people living and ageing with these disorders.

News

The Stem Cell Laboratory for CNS Disease Modeling (CSC Laboratory) in Lund, has created one of the largest iPSC biobanks from patients diagnosed with familial and idiopathic PD, and associated synucleionopathies. iPSCs are obtained by reprogramming patient’s somatic cells into pluripotent stem cells. This unique technique, which allows generating embryonic pluripotent stem cell-like cells, was awarded the Nobel Prize in Medicine in 2012.

MultiPark researcher Malin Parmar has been awarded the Swedish Research Council (SRC) Consolidator Grant. Over the coming 6 years she will receive 11 million SEK for her project “In vivo reprogramming: a new way to repair the brain".

The first transplantation of stem cells in patients with Parkinson's disease is almost within reach. However, it remains a challenge for researchers to control stem cells accurately in the lab in order to achieve successful and functional stem cell therapies for patients.

The New York Stem Cell Foundation (NYSCF) announced the 2016 class of NYSCF – Robertson Investigators, welcoming six of the most talented stem cell researchers and neuroscientists from around the world into the NYSCF Investigator Program. This year, Malin Parmar was announced as one of the six award winners. The award will provide funding – $1.5 million over five years.

Tau PET is a new and promising imaging method for Alzheimer’s disease. A case study from Lund University in Sweden now confirms that tau PET images correspond to a higher degree to actual changes in the brain. According to the researchers behind the study, this increases opportunities for developing effective drugs. 

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