Multipark

Faculty of Medicine | Lund University

MultiPark

MOVING SCIENCE FORWARD

MultiPark is a strategic research area funded by the Swedish Government. Building on the strong tradition of cutting-edge research on Parkinson's and Alzheimer's diseases at Lund University, our vision is to create new and innovative strategies for improved and novel treatments, disease modifications and eventually cures for neurodegenerative diseases, in order to improve the quality of life for people living and ageing with these disorders.

News

On April 10th MultiPark invites the public to a full-day event aimed at raising awareness about Parkinson's and the research dedicated towards the disease. MultiPark scientists Malin Parmar and Tomas Björklund will discuss looming clinical trials in the fields of cell therapy and gene therapy respectively. Young scienctists will participate in a Science Slam-contest where they will give brief popular science talks hoping to catch the attention of the audience. Radio host and actor Fredrik Ekblad will share his journey since being diagnosed with Parkinson's disease a couple of years ago. The day concludes with a panel Q&A.

Inflammatory processes occur in the brain in conjunction with stroke and neurological diseases such as Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s disease. Researchers from Lund University and Karolinska Institutet in Sweden, in close cooperation with a group led by Professor José L. Venero at the University of Seville, have presented new findings about some of the ‘key players’ in inflammation. In the long term, these findings could lead to new treatments.

Researchers have long sought treatments that can slow the progression of Parkinson's disease. Current treatments have for decades been only symptomatic in nature, supplying the neurotransmitter dopamine, which the dying nerve cells can no longer produce. Results from a recent clinical study offer hope that future therapies could take advantage of the brain's own protective mechanisms to limit neuronal cell death and restore dopamine production to natural levels.

Involuntary dyskinetic movements induced by treatment with levodopa (L-dopa) are a common problem for people with Parkinson’s disease. Now, however, researchers at Karolinska Institutet and Lund Universityseem to be close to a novel therapy to this distressing side effect. A treatment study published in the journal Brain shows that a drug that stimulates certain serotonin receptors in the brain counteracts the dyskinesia causing effects of L-dopa.

A new study from MultiPark scientists indicates that inherited viruses that are millions of years old play an important role in building up the complex networks that characterise the human brain.

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Contact

For more information, please contact:

Jens Persson, Public Relations Officer
 +46 46 222 08 76
 jens.persson@med.lu.se 

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