BAGADILICO

Faculty of Medicine | Lund University

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BAGADILICO – Excellence in Parkinson and Huntington Research

Parkinson’s disease and Huntington’s disease are caused by the death of nerve cells in the part of the brain called basal ganglia.

Our goal is to develop and improve treatments for the diseases and to improve quality of life for patients and their families.

News

With a simple blood test, scientists hope to make an earlier distinction between Parkinson's and related diseases, so-called atypical parkinsonism. Today, such a diagnosis requires samples of spinal fluid, a more painful, invasive and expensive method. Researchers at Lund University have developed a blood test that could offer an earlier and more accurate diagnosis. This would help make sure that people suffering from these diseases are receiving the right kind of treatment sooner.

In order to drive a car, you need a good balance between accelerator and brake. The same applies to a part of the brain – the striatum - that controls our movements. Research at Lund University in Sweden has led to new findings on the interaction between the “accelerator” and the “brake” in the striatum. These findings may guide the development of treatments for movement disorders such as those occurring in Parkinson’s disease.

The first transplantation of stem cells in patients with Parkinson's disease is almost within reach. However, it remains a challenge for researchers to control stem cells accurately in the lab in order to achieve successful and functional stem cell therapies for patients.

The New York Stem Cell Foundation (NYSCF) announced the 2016 class of NYSCF – Robertson Investigators, welcoming six of the most talented stem cell researchers and neuroscientists from around the world into the NYSCF Investigator Program. This year, Malin Parmar was announced as one of the six award winners. The award will provide funding – $1.5 million over five years. 

Tau PET is a new and promising imaging method for Alzheimer’s disease. A case study from Lund University in Sweden now confirms that tau PET images correspond to a higher degree to actual changes in the brain. According to the researchers behind the study, this increases opportunities for developing effective drugs.

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